• Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    "La salvaguardia della diversità genetica passa attraverso la conoscenza."

    Carlo Cosentino - 2011

  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

    La diversità biologica rappresenta il processo evolutivo che nel corso dei millenni ha generato le specie animali e vegetali esistenti attraverso la selezione naturale

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    La varietà di caratteri morfologici e funzionali rappresenta una risorsa “non rinnovabile"

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    Nel mondo vengono allevate e selezionate pochissime razze animali di interesse zootecnico che sostituiscono ovunque le razze locali."

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    Tutelare e valorizzare le razze zootecniche locali, i meticci e le specie tipiche."

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    Incentivare e salvag uardare la zootecnia estensiva può aiutare a contrastare l'abbandono dei territori rurali."

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    L'allevamento estensivo è fondamentali per il presidio e il governo del territorio rurale."

     


  • Biodiversità Zootecnica

     

    L'introduzione e l'invasione di Specie aliene rappresenta una minaccia per la biodiversità."

     


Alcuni plus sulla conservazione

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DIET OF THE ITALIAN HARE ( LEPUS CORSICANUS ) IN A SEMI-NATURAL LANDSCAPE OF SOUTHERN ITALY

Posted in Abstract

The food habits of the endangered Italian hare have not received adequate attention from researchers. In

this study, the diet composition of this species and its seasonal variation were assessed by analysing faecal pellets in a semi-natural landscape in the south of Italy. The results showed that hares feed on 62 species of plants during the year, with a conspicuous presence of herbaceous ones (e.g., Trifolium pratense, Brachypodium sylvaticum , Festuca arundinacea) as these occurred at high frequencies in most of the faecal samples. In spring, diet composition was characterised by a high percentage of Graminaceae ( > 37%). In the other seasons, hares also included fruits (e.g., Prunus spinosa , Pyrus piraster , Malus sylvestris ), which, in autumn, accounted for > 27%. There were significant differences among seasons (p < 0.001) in terms of Margalef ’ s richness, Shannon diversity, and Buzas and Gibson ’ s evenness. The smallest values of richness and diversity were observed in spring. Dietary overlap was low between spring and the other seasons; conversely, there was substantial overlap ( > 70%) in the diets during the other seasons with a more

pronounced similarity between summer and autumn (S ø rensen, C s = 0.80; Morisita-Horn, C MH = 0.73).

Keywords: diet; faecal analysis; Lepus corsicanus ; microhistological identification.

 

Pierangelo Freschi , Simonetta Fascetti , Mauro Musto , Egidio Mallia , Carlo Cosentino and Rosanna Paolino (2014). Diet of the Italian hare ( Lepus corsicanus ) in a semi-natural landscape of southern Italy. Mammalia 2014; aop;  DOI 10.1515/mammalia-2013-0117.

DIET OF THE APENNINE HARE IN A SOUTHERN ITALY REGIONAL PARK

Posted in Abstract

In this study, we examined the annual diet composition of Lepus corsicanus in two different sites within a southern Italy Regional Park. Vegetation of site 1 was composed of a mixed scrub forest (Viburno–Quercetum ilicis s.l.), a ripisilva (Roso sempervirentis–Populetum nigrae), some thermophilous scrubs (Pruno–Rhamnetalia alaterni), and a Pinus halepensis reforested area. Site 2 comprised a mixedoak forest (Centaureo–Quercetum pubescentis s.l.) with meadows and arable lands. Micro-histological analysis of faecal samples revealed that hares utilised 70 different species of plants during the year, indicating the capability of the Apennine hare of exploiting a wide variety of vegetation. Herbaceous plants (Hemicryptophytes, particularly graminoid grasses, and Geophytes) predominated in the diet. Brachypodium sylvaticum (9.44 %) and Allium subhirsutum (8.28 %) were the major contributors to the diet in sites 2 and 1, respectively. Other taxa found most often in the diet were Trifolium pratense (site 1: 8.19 %; site 2: 5.80 %) and Prunus spinosa (site 1: 7.03 %; site 2: 4.10 %). Significant differences were found between sites in terms of diet richness, diversity, and evenness. Nevertheless, both the similarity indices (Morisita–Horn: 0.79; Sørensen: 0.87) showed that the food composition of the hare’s diet was broadly the same in both sites. Some qualitative and quantitative differences between sites were due to the availability or consumption of some plant species and evidenced that the Apennine hare can modify its trophic niche in order to adapt its dietary requirements to the availability of food.

 

Key words Lepus corsicanus, Diet, Faecal analysis, Micro-histological techniques.

P. Freschi, S. Fascetti, M. Musto, E. Mallia,A. C. Blasi, C. Cosentino, R. Paolino (2014). Diet of the Apennine hare in a southern Italy Regional Park. European Journal of Wildlife Research DOI 10.1007/s10344-014-0799-y.

SEMINARIO: CONTABILITA' E FINANZA IN AGRICOLTURA

Posted in Convegni

Agriturismo Carrera della Regina

5 Ottobre 2013

Progetto Formazione e Comunicazione in Agricoltura

Scai Comunicazione e UNIBAS SAFE

Seminario: CONTABILITA' E FINANZA IN AGRICOLTURA

Dott.ssa Rosanna PAOLINO e Dott. Carlo COSENTINO

Contatti

UNIVERSITA' DEGLI STUDI
DI BASILICATA

Facoltà di Agraria

Dipartimento di Scienze delle Produzioni Animali
Campus Macchia Romana


85100 - Potenza
Italia

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